Tag Archives: sky

Aww, Purdy. Storm Rainbow.

Sometimes you just see beauty and want to capture it, so that you can remember it later. That was the deep down feeling I had when I saw this rainbow. This was actually part of a double rainbow near where I live, but I focused tight on the brightest one. And boy, did it just keep going brighter and brighter… for almost an hour. Very impressive.

See more at www.kelleybard.com.

 

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It’s The Journey… “The Road Curves”

 
I like visual reminders of things I should know but frequently forget… so today’s photo is a cheerful reminder of “It’s the journey, not the destination”. I took this photo of the landscape, but it’s the sinuous road which catches my eye and makes me want to explore this glorious part of Utah again and again.

See more at www.kelleybard.com. Enjoy your journey!

 


Utah Storm Light breaking Through

 
One of the last photos taken on my recent trip through Utah, Arizona and Nevada. This was in the center of Utah. I watched this storm build for a while and stopped to take several images of it… this was when I finally started to see rain falling off to the right and I wasn’t sure how long it would be before I got hit with it, so I stopped and took several exposures for an HDR. I love how the underside of the clouds is so richly textured, and I’m a sucker for sunrays so the strong light beams are incredible to me. The dappled light on the ground was an extra gift here, as I really wanted to get some light on the ground and for the most part it was in shadow. HDR for HDR Friday… enjoy!

Thanks so much for viewing my work here. If you are interested, my website has lots to explore and enjoy. www.kelleybard.com. Feel free to browse!

 


Hidden Valley- Utah explorations

 

Valley found as I explored SE Utah along one of the Scenic Byways. Utah is really beautiful. I can’t wait for more photo explorations there!

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Route 66- Using Textures to Create Interest

 

One of my favorite roads in America, Route 66 runs through the Southwest and has sections that are found as far east as Chicago. It’s an old road, the main artery into the west for much of the 20th century but largely abandoned now. The sections that are open go through beautiful, open country with hardly any traffic. Some of the towns located on it are hanging on by a thread, others are completely shuttered. It’s eerie.

You also find these old Burma-Shave ads all over the place. They are priceless: odd, quirky, mostly dark humor that keeps you interested in what the next sign down the road has to say. I pulled over here before a big curve to take in the road, valley, and sign. The resulting image (3 exposures processed in HDR) still didn’t give the aged feeling to it, so I worked on the image with some textures and detailing. I like how the warmed up colors really highlight the old look of the sign, and the sky is much more interesting with the layers of textures. Overall, a photo I really enjoy.

See more at www.kelleybard.com. Thanks!

 


Bryce Canyon Tree and a New Use for HDR

 

Have you ever taken a landscape image you liked in theory but it just didn’t have great or interesting lighting? Here is a way I’ve found to create a better image from a good one:This was a tree I found on the way to Bryce Canyon National Park. It was in a gorgeous area of these red rock formations, and I looked up and saw this tree and fell in love. The sky was more blue, and the rock wasn’t as vivid or well lit (it was solidly overcast, so the light was nice and soft but not interesting), so I chose to process it as an HDR. I took 3 images (my normal landscape protocol so I can pick and choose HDR’s in the future) and processed them in Photomatix. The result I liked best left the tree and rock dark. So I processed it a second time with the same images, this time making the light on the rock brighter and lightening the tree area as well. I followed the process discussed below and mixed the two .tif’s to create the rock lighting that I wanted. Then I finished the photoshop creation with some cleanup touches and here you are!

Process:

1. Take 3 or more shots (for me, the Canon can take -2, 0, and +2 exposures every time I shoot an image) whenever you might possibly use a photo for an HDR.

2. Process the set of exposures in Photomatix, the Nik HDR program, or Photoshop (any HDR creation program). Process it once as your ideal sky and save it. Then undo tone mapping and re-create it with your ideal rock lighting. Save that one as well.

3. Put both images into Photoshop, layer the images (shift and drag one onto the other) and mix them however you find best!

4. Finish it with noise reduction, sharpening, saturation and hue changes… whatever you wish for your HDR image.

5. Save it as a final image and enjoy!

So, a new option to use with good photos that I want to turn into great photos. Nice to find.

See this at www.kelleybard.com. Thanks for viewing!

 

 


Zion Lights

 

 

Two versions of this image for your viewing enjoyment… and it’s HDR Friday so they are, um, well… HDR’s. Taken in Zion National Park (which, by the way, I’ve wanted to go to since I moved to the 4 Corners region. So glad I went, and I need to spend much more time exploring this beautiful area). I believe this is the “Great White Throne”, but I”m not sure if I have the name right. I love how the different versions came out so vastly different. The great lighting on the mountain is more visible in the color version, but the black and white one is more intense, in my view. What do you think?

Will be available at www.kelleybard.com, come on by and check out what I have there when you get a chance!